Vital Few, Useful Many


#|A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K|L|M|N|O|P|Q|R|S|T|U|V|W|X|Y|Z Index  


Vital Few, Useful Many - short version

(1) A term Joseph M. Juran used to describe the Pareto principle, which he first defined in 1950. (The principle was used much earlier in economics and inventory control methods.) The principle suggests most effects come from relatively few causes; that is, 80% of the effects come from 20% of the possible causes. The 20% of the possible causes are referred to as the "vital few;" the remaining causes are referred to as the "useful many." When Juran first defined this principle, he referred to the remaining causes as the "trivial many," but realizing that no problems are trivial in quality assurance, he changed it to "useful many." Also see "eighty-twenty (80-20).

(2) These are the few (20%) independent variables, which contribute to maximum (80%) of the total variation. These are identified through Pareto Charts and Design of Experiments.



 



Chartitnow

IQ Catch Banner

Advertising





Definition in Russian| Definition in French| Definition in Japanese| Definition in Vietnamese| Definition in Greek| Definition in Polish| Definition in Turkish| Definition in Portuguese| Definition in Hindi| Definition in Swedish| Definition in Arabic| Definition in Chinese| Definition in Dutch| Definition in Hebrew| Definition in German| Definition in Korean| Definition in Italian| Definition in Spanish| Definition in Thai|